Ooh, my favorite!


Animal Camouflage
March 21, 2013, 3:48 pm
Filed under: Nature

orchidmantis

This is a Malaysian Orchid Mantis. I had no idea there was such a thing but I am so happy there is because she’s fascinating! Casually lounging among the orchid blossoms, patiently waiting for dinner to come along, and looking damn good while doing it. I like her style.

This and more great animal camo images from photographer and Biological Photography teacher Alex Hyde over at the Daily Mail.



Urban Farmer
March 11, 2013, 11:50 am
Filed under: Farmer's Market, Food, Green, Health, Nature

gardenresearch

Our next project is a bit of a biggie, and for me it’s a definite first as I am very much not a dirty girl. My friends, I have been busy researching, studying, note-taking on all things urban farmer and I couldn’t be more excited. For someone who loves the farmer’s market, eating seasonally, and craves vegetables as much as chocolate it only makes sense that I should learn how to tend a garden. I’m starting from absolute zero, in fact, I probably couldn’t know less about gardening so much will be learned in practice. I received some great advice from Andrew’s wonderful mom though, and she put it simply:

“Be prepared to kill a lot of plants.”

So get ready for an honest look at my first attempt at gardening and raising four chickens. (I wonder if this means I’ll have to clean the coop.) This will be interesting.

plotting

I also wanted to share this killer Ted Talks video with guerilla gardener Ron Finley in South Central LA. His vision and work on Food Forests in the vacant lots of South Central is inspiring and exciting (especially having to initially fight the city for the right to use the land in the parking strip in front of his house). Another great quote I’ll have on hand, Ron says:

“Don’t call me if you want to sit around and have meetings. If you want to meet with me come to the garden with your shovel so we can plant some shit.”



Fish, Forage, and Farm at The Willows Inn
March 5, 2013, 11:05 am
Filed under: Food, Nature, Seattle, Travel

Last fall Andrew was invited up to Lummi Island for a little getaway at The Willows Inn. I’ve written about my love affair with the island and the restaurant before, so I was desperate to find a way to cleverly blackmail work my way into the trip. The Fish, Forage, Farm event is a hands-on excurision driven by guest participation, with each of the activities and the menus all focusing back to the island, restaurant, staff, history. So two nights of great food, happy company, and quiet island life was sure to be nothing short of epic, even in the midst of a Pacific Northwest autumn.

Of course I worked my way in and have been waiting forever to share the full experience with you. I wanted to wait until after they reopened (they’re on sabbatical for January and February), and since they open this Thursday I figure I’ve waited long enough.

There was more food and fun than I could even begin to share, so below is a little glimpse into a weekend away at The Willows:

FishForageFarm

Our hosts for the two days were Chef Ben, and Nettles farm maven Jennifer. There were five others that joined in, and we were all welcomed in front of a cozy fire at The Inn. A beautiful set-up of freshly baked breads and pressed apple cider (spiked with Buffalo Trace bourbon!) were there to help us settle in as we made introductions and talked about ‘the agenda’ for the days ahead. And when I say agenda, let me just say that at one point Ben made sure to mention that if ever there came a point where one felt that they needed a nap…that they should do just that. (Some kind of agenda, no?) We also each received a sweet little welcome kit with a small notebook and pencil for notes, and a pair of Japanese herb scissors.

nettles

plantingWe soon made our way to Nettles Farm, just up the hill from The Inn, and Jennifer gave us a great little tour before putting us to work in the hoop house. And by work I mean she had the seven of us plant two rows of napa cabbage sprouts, harvest some kohlrabi for lunch the next day, and collect eggs. Yeah, it was rough. It was fun to know that in just a few short weeks those cabbage sprouts would grow to be used by Chef Blaine and his team, but my very favorite part of the time on the farm was spending time with Jennifer and hearing her fun stories about cultivating the farm, learning about the different varieties of each plant, and her overall enthusiasm for eating seasonally.

And then came lunch….

workinglunch

After “working” on the farm it was time to gather in the farmhouse for lunch, and since it was the first meal we’d enjoy with one another there was much to be learned and shared. Of course, the seemingly endless supply of white wine helped us all ease into conversation mode. But everyone was beyond lovely, and ultimately we were all there because good food, and being connected to it was in some way or another, important to all of us. The creamy potato soup, flat bread, and wine were all unbelievable.

Picture 1Dinner that night was some sort of amazing roasted duck, hay smoked celery root, kale caesar salad with chicken crackling, and beets roasted in bread, but of course all of the dinner meal pictures are too dark to share, and I just hate to post anything that doesn’t (even in the smallest way) attempt to convey how gorgeous each dish/meal was. So, let us move on to breakfast…

breakfast

For nightly accommodations we were all split between two seaside guest houses, so each meal would switch between the houses. The first breakfast was at the house across the way and was a tasty mixed grain porridge, macerated berries, and gravlax from reef net caught salmon. How often does one get to wake to a perfectly made breakfast from an amazing chef? Not often enough. It was the perfect start before a relaxing autumn walk through the Otto Preserve, and a lesson on reef netting from Jerry.

reefnet

Jerry is a badass reef net expert that has lived and fished the waters around Lummi for years, and I just loved listening to his stories and looking through his old photos. Since my very first meal on Lummi I’ve been fascinated by reef netting which is a historical method that allows for a more humane and sustainable way to catch the salmon. It ultimately allows the fisherman to select the best catches and set free those that don’t meet culinary standards with minimal shock. The pontoons you see above are rolled out into the bay and each platform/tower has a fisherman with a corner of the net. They trap the salmon and pull uniformly to raise the catch.

After a fun morning outside and a great chat with Jerry I love so much that Ben had some nap time free time for us, because after that it would be time for the most perfect lunch ever.

lunch

BenBrandon

Ben as a chef: his attention to detail, effortless skill, and passion for good food was infectious and exhilarating. Ben as a host: was more like a friend, generously sharing his knowledge, excellence, and love for the island with all of us. Ben is my favorite.

We were also really lucky to have his friend Brandon visiting from Toronto. It was great fun to see two gifted chefs and friends working together and the result was in this meal — one of my all-time favorite dining experiences. Crab salad (cleaned by two of our wonderful new friends in the group), fried smelt, freshly baked focaccia, horseradish creme, seaweed kohlrabi salad, and lots of bubbly.

crab, foccacia, greens

Our final nights dinner was another amazing feast of lamb, fresh oysters, charred cabbage, and pickeld shallots. There was also a guest appearance from our favorite bartender from The Willows, Emily, and she made her signature gin fizz with some of the eggs we’d harvested the day before!

It was hard to prepare to leave the next morning, but we had a lovely farewell breakfast at The Willows and received a sweet farewell note and gift from Ben and Jennifer. The eggs we’d harvested were ready for us in a sweet little basket. Those little and meaningful little touches add up to so much.

Picture 8Just like a meal at The Willows Inn, the two-day escape for Fish, Forage, and Farm is the treat of a lifetime. The relaxing pace and soul-stirring meals with new friends was exceptional and memorable. And with genuine and wonderfully gifted hosts like Jennifer and Ben, the tone was set for a meaningful experience with a rare opportunity to connect with and understand the food that’s available at that time and place. It’s a powerful feeling.

The spring season will be the perfect time to join in, and the “agendas” will differ with each session and season, so if you’re interested give them a call or check their site for upcoming dates. I would do it again in an instant, and would also like to wrangle some friends to come along too.

The Willows Inn | Lummi Island, WA | (360) 758-2620

buoysbubbly



Birds of Paradise
February 28, 2013, 8:02 am
Filed under: Nature

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology has a fascinating project on the beautiful birds of New Guinea. The Birds of Paradise project documents 39 different species and the principles of their evolution. Their extraordinary colors, plumes, sounds, and shape-shifting dances are fascinating! You might remember some of them from one of the Planet Earth episodes, but here there are many videos and they are all addicting. This is the introduction, but here are some of my faves: shape-shifting, dance, the Ribbon-tailed Astrapia,



Winter Garden at the Arboretum
February 25, 2013, 10:30 am
Filed under: Beauty, Clean, Green, Health, Nature, Seattle

WitchHazel

I’d never seen a Witch Hazel blossom before last year (god, I love this shot!), and ever since I’ve been dying for its return in the Winter Garden at  the Arboretum. I’m kind of ashamed to say that it never dawned on me to think beyond the magic tincture I splash on my face each night, but behind the natural toner is a wonderfully fragrant and vibrant tree that blooms in winter. So if you’re in need of a floral fix and can find an upcoming dry day you should head into the Winter Garden for a quiet stroll and a few deep breaths of the Witch Hazel blossoms. (It makes for a great little date too!)

Oh, and can we just talk about the rules of visiting public gardens for a moment? Let’s all agree not to snap off a branch or blossom to take away. Didn’t we cover this in Kindergarten? I seem to remember the lesson, but sadly so many others we saw didn’t. Savor and share. 

How I use Witch Hazel toner 

After cleansing, the purpose of a toner is to remove excess oil and dirt, and also to close the pores and restore pH balance. Witch Hazel is a natural antiseptic, so if you make sure the product you’re getting is alcohol free, it can perform all the functions of a conventional toner, but without the added preservatives and chemicals. After that you’re free and clear to lotion it up.

Bottom line: it’s natural, it works, it’s cheap, and it will last you quite a long time.

I use Thayer’s. Different varieties here for about $6.



Animal Camouflage
January 29, 2013, 10:38 am
Filed under: Nature

camouflaged_bitternCan you see the hidden bittern here? Check out the original image on Flickr and it’s even more difficult to see.

[via The Conservation Report, image by Lisa Lawley on Flickr]



Dancing Sea Dragons
November 19, 2012, 11:45 am
Filed under: Nature

A must watch!

[From BBC’s Life Series]




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