Ooh, my favorite!


Urban Bee Co. Seattle
July 24, 2013, 11:35 am
Filed under: Clean, Green, Health, My favorite things, Nature, Seattle

urbanbee

I found a great new honey to add to our collection and this one’s really cool. The Urban Bee Co. is a Seattle-based group that cultivates healthy environments for bees and collects honey from small neighborhood apiaries, urban farms, and some backyard hives too. This guy I got is from my ‘hood, right down the way on the Alleycat Acres farm on MLK and Columbia where they have hops, chickens, harvest parties, and workshops. Each hive is free from chemicals, antibiotics, high fructose corn syrup, and plastic. The honey is harvested in small batches, never heated or filtered, bottled by hand, and delivered by bike. Hyper-local!

I picked up this bottle (from the fall harvest) at my very fave Sugarpill, but you can order online, or join their CSA.

urbanbee2

There are also great resources available through Urban Bee Co. and their partnership with my other neighbor Stone Soup Gardens. One of the most exciting offerings is help to set up a permaculture bee garden (wish we knew about this before we did all the research on our own). Helping our bees and building community. Great stuff. Makes my heart swell with happiness.



Head in the sand
July 8, 2013, 12:07 pm
Filed under: Compassion, Farmer's Market, Food, Green, Health

movies
Most nights after, mornings before, and days away from work I have a habit of turning on the TV and finding something completely mindless to watch on Instant Netflix. I don’t want to think because the way I feel I swear it would cause some sort of brain injury. I just want to melt into the couch and watch any given episode of Family Guy for the millionth time.

But, alas, one can only disconnect for so long, and I soon became aware of how empty and uninspiring that habit was making me feel. For the past few months I’ve changed up my routine and I’ve come across some really interesting documentaries that are streaming on Instant now. I’ll admit that I’m not always in the mood to watch a super-intense, angry-making, political-injustice type movie…I just take them so personally and its effects can be hard on me. But when I do find the time and the energy to watch them I always appreciate how my perspective shifts and the decisions I make are that much more informed. Here’s to not being an ostrich!

Queen of the Sun

I desperately want to add bees to our little farm, and as much as I’ve tried to make it work we just don’t have the room next to the chickens. This documentary from 2011 is beautiful and insightful. (I just wish the cover wasn’t so creepy.) With our beloved honey bees at the center of the story there’s also some really great profiles on some forward-thinking (and some wonderfully eccentric) apiarists and permaculture farmers, discussions on the dangers of monocrop culture and pesticide use, and a really interesting segment on commercial bees and the breeding of Queen’s. Complex and I can’t lie, very emotional it’s the type of movie that will change the way you think of bees, swarms, and farming.

The Happy Movie

A glimpse of people and cultures around the world in an attempt to identify what makes us happy. Positive psychology is a real thing and it’s pretty cool. After I saw how a rickshaw runner lives in India, or how a once beautiful woman found happiness after a terrible accident it helped me reevaluate my knee-jerk reactions to the petty injustices of the day. I often need reminding so I have watched this a few times. The story of the people of Okinawa, the highest concentration of the oldest living people on the planet, was particularly inspiring.

Hungry for Change

I have watched this documentary several times, and it’s usually when I need that little kick in the ass to get things back on track with my health and diet. There’s suddenly been a lot of talk on the addictive nature of refined sugar and flour and this will help explain how and why it’s so hard for us to step back. There’s also a ton of great information on natural health and beauty which is one of my very favorite topics. Heal your body from the inside!

HOT COFFEE

EVERYONE knows the story of the hot coffee incident from McDonald’s in the 80’s, but I guarantee that you don’t know the REAL story. It’s heartbreaking and so much more complex than any of us ever knew. This story and many more will change the way you think about “frivolous lawsuits” in our country and the effects of tort reform. It’s a very interesting look at how the hot coffee incident was exploited to ultimately protect corporations and change our justice system at the expense of the average citizen.



Accessories
April 29, 2013, 4:35 pm
Filed under: Clean, Compassion, Green, Health, Home, Organic

accessories

Apologies for the delay with this final installment of my eco-friendly Earth Week favorites. (The neighbor we were stealing wi-fi from suddenly protected his network. The bastard.)  So here it is, a list of some socially conscious accessories and toys. Some of these are first steps in making an effort at a greener life, but I always look and hope for the next iterations just around the corner.

1.  Beeswax candles  Burning 100% beeswax candles are the best way to add a pure, natural fragrance to a room while also cleaning and purifying the air. Burning beeswax emits negative ions that get rid of odors and toxins (like dusts, molds, pollens, and viruses!) by attracting and destroying positively charged particles. Conventional candles and air fresheners are filled with chemicals, just read the label. While these candles are more expensive than others, they burn longer and much cleaner and have the most beautiful natural fragrance. Definitely worth the investment. We get ours from a local nunnery that makes them all by hand, but they are also available at Brookfarm General store.

2.  Baggu Bags  Always a favorite around here, I love the bright colors and heavy-lifting capacity of these guys. I love that Seattle has banned plastic bags and now charges for paper, so if saving paper wasn’t incentive enough, now there’s a toll to consider. They used to have great mesh produce bags that I still use and love. Since they’re no longer available try something like these.

3.  Powerstrip  Most of our electronics (TVs, laptops, phone chargers continue to pull power even when they’re not in use or powered on. It’s called Phantom Load, and the power leached is HUGE, so much so that when people switch to using a powerstrip they notice huge savings monthly. Simply plug all of your electronics into a single powerstrip and flip the switch to completely power off the flow of electricity.

Eco- Tip: Instead of buying new, try picking up a used one at Goodwill.

4.  Preserve toothbrush  These guys are made of recycled yogurt cups, and once you’re done you can send them back to Preserve to be recycled into plastic lumber for picnic tables and park benches. I’d prefer to move away from plastics completely, but at least these guys are doing something other than sending it to landfills. Send your brush back with the pre-addressed packaging, or save them up and drop them off at your nearest Whole Foods. They’ll send them back for you.

5.  Coyuchi Organic cotton linens  Again, moving away from conventional cotton is better for the environment and for you. Since we use our sheets and bath linens everyday it’s worth investing in some nice organic cotton. We love our Coyuchi’s, and I especially love stealing Andrew’s big bath blanket towels. They are often on sale at One King’s Lane, or check them out at Coyuchi site.

6.  Toyota Prius C  Until last fall I had been driving my first car (a ’98 Honda Civic) for the past 15 years! It’s not that I don’t lust after a sexy sports car, it was just that I am conscious of every mile I drive, and every tank I fill. With some nudging from mom and dad I started looking for a new car and as much as I fantasized about a badass Audi coupe there really was only one car that was truly me, and that was the new Prius C…a slightly sportier version of the classic Prius. Since I’m smaller I like that there are fewer blindspots in this body style. Perfect for scooting around town.  I love my little car, and more importantly I love my gas mileage!



Cleaning
April 25, 2013, 3:13 pm
Filed under: Clean, Compassion, Green, Health, Home

Cleaning

 

These guys aren’t as fun or as sexy as pantry staples or cosmetics, but they are an easy and important way to be kind to the planet. The great things about them is that for the most part they’re easily accessible. Here are some of our favorite cleaners for laundry, dishes, and around the house.

1.  Food grade hydrogen peroxide (3%)  This guy again! It really is one badass all purpose cleaner and disinfectant. Again, must be food grade! Think all the benefits of bleach without the awful smell and toxic properties that are awful for us and aquatic life. It’s kind of mind blowing that this one ingredient can be used as a natural rinse for fruits and veggies, a clean way to disinfect countertops and bathrooms, AND also to purify skin, rinse for a clean mouth, and sanitize cuts and scrapes. All this from an extra oxygen molecule.

2-3.  Ecover Laundry Wash and Dish Tablets  A wonderful, forward thinking company with a great line of eco-friendly products that are quickly biodegradable and made with plant and mineral based ingredients. Their factories are run entirely on green electricity and even the bottles are made of a green plastic created from sugarcane (no use of crude oil). It’s a pretty amazing company, their site is a really interesting read.

4.  Natural wood brushes  No plastic on these guys, so there’s not as much guilt when they finally die and head to the garbage. Wood with sisal or tampico bristles. Lots of other great natural brushes at Brookfarm General Store.

5.  Bon Ami  Truly a good friend. This guy is perfect for scrubbing the tub or a greasy pan. Five simple ingredients. There’s also the original 1886 version which I just learned about.

Tomorrow’s the last day to celebrate Earth Week, so I’ll close out with my favorite accessories for around the house! (Are you enjoying this as much as I am?)



Health & Beauty
April 24, 2013, 3:39 pm
Filed under: Beauty, Clean, Green, Health

ecohealthbeautyToday I’m sharing some of my faves for eco-friendly health and beauty. Some you may have seen around here before, and others are new and have been secret favorites for a while. My focus for an eco-friendly beauty routine centers around finding products without the use of petrochemicals and toxins that pollute our watersouces, sea life, and our bodies. When I first started this blog I wrote a lot about our water and its sad state. These guys are all water-soluble, toxin-free, and whenever possible I buy in bulk to reduce packaging and materials, and of course recycle or reuse.

1.  Auromere Ayurvedic herbal toothpaste  After some of my go-to natural toothpaste brands sold out to larger corporations I was happy to find Auromere. It actually kicks the ass of any other toothpaste I’d tried with 24 herbal extracts and a fluoride-free formula. Contrary to popular belief, we do not want fluoride in our toothpaste.

2.  Raw Organic Coconut Oil  My lotion for body and face. Be sure to find one that is organic, raw, and cold pressed. Since we also use it for cooking we buy it in bulk from Aunt Patty’s. I keep a small container around the house and refill as needed. I’ve seen some people that whip it into a cream since it’s hard at room temp, but it is an oil after all, and introducing that much air can turn it rancid if you don’t use it fast enough. I prefer to leave it as is.

3.  Baking soda  Baking soda is a great way to naturally whiten your teeth, and it’s quite noticeable, but not in a fake Hollywood sort of way. Brush regularly for a few days and you’ll notice a difference. More than the aesthetics it’s an important addition to brushing because it changes the pH of your mouth to make it less acidic, and ultimately creates a happier environment for your teeth and gums. I keep a small dish in the bathroom and dip my toothbrush (with toothpaste) and brush as usual. Baking soda already in toothpaste does not count. Give this a try and see the difference.

4.  NatraCare Organic tampons  Cotton is one of the most sprayed crops around the globe. We don’t often think of a polluted t-shirt or cotton ball, but the sad truth is that it is. And because of this, organic feminine hygiene products are so important. NatraCare is a wonderful brand at the forefront of women’s and environmental health; their products are all chlorine-free, biodegradable, and made of 100% organic cotton. No synthetic materials (including plastics, rayon, dyes, or fragrance) are ever used.  I’m sorry, but your girlie bits are an absorbable organ, what goes there is ultimately absorbed and stored in fatty tissues…which is how cancers begin to form. And since a woman can use as many as 11,000 tampons in her lifetime it matters what we use, and it matters what we throw away.

NatraCare is available online or at health stores and Whole Foods. (Trader Joe’s also has an organic version. I don’t know as much about it, but I have used them before.)

5.  John Masters Organics shampoo  I just wrote about this last week, but if you’re looking for a high-end product line to replace your go-to shampoo this is a great one. They do not source products that have been genetically modified or extracted with heat. A majority of the ingredients are organic, and each product has a stamp to show you precisely what percentage is.

6.  Josie Maran creme blush  My favorite blush free of GMOs, pthalates, synthetic fragrance, and petrochemicals. Organic oils make for a soft and creamy texture that’s easy to apply (just a tiny bit is needed), and the natural dewey color is just beautiful. The compact is also biodegrabable.

7.  Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide  This is one of those products that’s sparked fierce debate. I can only imagine it’s because a single product with so many uses frightens people, and because in super concentrated form it is as volatile as bleach. But here, for health and beauty (and of course first-aid) uses, we are using food grade at 3%.  As a mouthwash I take 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and add an equal part of filtered water (stored in a glass container with a loose fitting topper). In addition to the baking soda it’s a great whitener but more importantly it kills harmful bacteria between your teeth and gums.

It’s also great for skin, and we often add some to our baths. It truly is a wondrous ingredient that’s good for the planet and for you too. Tomorrow I’ll share how we use it for cleaning. Be sure to use only food grade! Conventional hydrogen peroxide you find at the drug store has harsh metallic stabilizers that should not even be used topically! It’s difficult to find so you’ll have to search online. We buy in bulk and create our own solutions, but this product is available at Pharmaca and other health stores.

8.  Dr. Bronner’s Pure Castille Soap  Vegetable based, biodegradable, and made from organic, fair trade oils, there are no synthetics or preservatives. Read the ingredients…you can actually recognize all nine of them. The scent comes from the oils, so no artificial fragrance has been added. My fave is the almond, but there are many others that are nice too. (I will also occasionally add this into my shampoo rotation.) These guys are available to refill, so buying in bulk is easy and cost-effective, just look for the large jugs. Central Co-op here in Seattle has them, and I believe Whole Foods does also.

9.  Organic sweet almond oil  The best eye makeup remover ever! No need for scary conventional brands when all you need is a single ingredient. We all know how tender the skin around our eyes is, so gently removing make-up with almond oil will help keep us looking younger while removing and moisturizing. Mom buys in bulk and shares with me. It’s also great to use as a massage oil.

* Other favorites not shown here are Tarte BB Tinted Moisturizer and Aztec Bentonite Healing Clay.

Tomorrow, some of my favorite eco-friendly cleaning products. Yay!



Kitchen and Pantry
April 23, 2013, 3:57 pm
Filed under: Clean, Compassion, Farmer's Market, Food, Green, Health, Home

KitchenPantry

One of the biggest impacts we have on the planet is the way we eat. Stigma’s and elitisms aside, eating locally, seasonally, and organically is one of the best things we can do to spare the environment. Here are a few of my favorite kitchen and pantry staples that are either from close by or are amazing products grown with eco-friendly, biodynamic methods.

1.  Eating Locally, Seasonally, and GMO-free. The average piece of produce on the shelf is 7-10 days old! Nutrients dissipate, so supporting your local farmer means fresher, happier produce, but it also means you’re eating what’s in season. You know those beautiful berries you see at the store in December? Perhaps they’re organic, perhaps not; regardless though, we aren’t meant to eat berries in December. Industrial Organic agriculture may have fewer pesticides but it is far from eco-friendly as the amount of irrigated water and transportation (often times) into the country takes a huge amount of resources. This article from the New York Times sheds some light on the Industrial Organic model. It’s sadly, not a good one.

2.  Briden Wilson Farms Organic Almonds  A family farm in Arbuckle, California that produces beautiful, organic raw almonds. They grow both natural and organic, but it’s very exciting that they have just planted an additional organic orchard. It shows that every socially responsible food purchase you make is a vote toward greener agriculture. As they live and work on the farm their use of chemicals for the natural almonds is often avoided by encouraging natural predators to the pests that will help to minimize disease and infestation. We love supporting this small family farm, so we purchase these almonds in bulk for homemade almond milk, and almond butter.

3.  Aptera Olive Oil When I can’t get a product locally, I make sure that what I do get is of superior quality and produced with eco-friendly practices. This olive oil from the island of Crete is not only one of the best olive oils in our collection, but the pricepoint is crazy affordable. It is also naturally organic as it is illegal to spray pesticides on the island. Most of the island still uses old-world biodynamic farming methods. I get this guy at Central Co-op.

4.  de Buyer Mineral B Pans  It’s virtually impossible to find non non-stick pans. Everything has a teflon coating (even Polar Bears and dolphins do now). It’s a toxic chemical that we don’t want in us (women of child-bearing age and children especially), and we don’t want in our water. Making the switch to steel pans may take slightly more care than conventional non-sticks, but your cooking, your food, and even your health will improve dramatically.

de Buyer has been manufacturing steel pans in France since 1830. The Mineral B pans are made of 99% iron with no chemicals or coatings. An organic beeswax finish is used to prevent oxidation during shipping, and also to aid in seasoning for natural non-stick surface. These pans are not only free from chemicals, but they are the best you can get period. Now easily found stateside, you can find them at Williams Sonoma and other kitchen shops.

5.  Pride and Joy Raw Milk  You know your milk will be good when the farmers consider themselves “grass farmers who also milk cows.” Pride and Joy manages their pastures without the use of any chemicals or genetically modified ingredients because their cows eat 100% grass (clover, alfalfa, and chicory too) during grazing season, and the finest hay during non-grazing months. While this leads to a lower yield per cow it ultimately results in a healthier herd and the highest quality milk. Their cows produce milk for up to 12 years, compared to just 3-4 with a conventional dairy. The girls are never given hormones and when antibiotics are used (only in life threatening situations) that cow is removed from the herd, the milk is not used, and the cow is no longer considered organic.

Raw milk is very difficult to find in Washington state, but it’s important to use in place of pasteurized because it is alive with active enzymes, antioxidants, and amino and fatty acids. All of this and more is killed during pasturization and homogenization. Unpasteurized means less resources and energy. Better for you and better for the environment.

Located in Granger, WA. Milk is available for pick-up, but also available at certain co-ops in Seattle. If you’re not in the Seattle area, look for a local dairy and research their farm and practices.

6.  Hama Hama Oysters  Sustainably farmed at the base of the Hama Hama river, in the Hood Canal, the Hama Hama oyster farm has been around since 1922. The oysters grow slowly taking twice as long to reach maturity. Still owned by the same family the farming practices from the oysters to the sustainably harvested timber are as green as you can get. We love our Hama Hama’s. And if you’re interested, you’ll find Andrew and me at their Oyster Rama this Saturday (April 27th).

7.  Bob’s Red Mill  Employee owned, non-GMO seeds, and one of the largest organic whole grains lines in the country Bob’s uses traditional methods of grinding whole grains with a stone mill that stays at cool temperatures. This ensures the nutrients stay in tact and uses less energy. Milling, testing, packaging, and distributing is all done in-house too. We don’t use too much flour, but when I bake I love Bob’s organic flour. We also love his stone ground oats for oatmeal.

8.  Jo Landron Atmospheres sparkling wine  One of my all-time favorite glasses of bubbly you may remember my post on it here. In 1999 the vineyard was certified as 100% organic and by 2008 the vineyard was converted and certified as fully biodynamic. The fruit is only ever harvested by hand, and the bubbly itself is created in the traditional method meaning that the second fermentation is done in the bottle. If I’m going to enjoy a bottle of sparkling wine it’s so much better knowing it’s biodynamic and chemical-free. (Hence, no hangover the next day!)

 



Happy Earth Day!
April 22, 2013, 1:55 pm
Filed under: Clean, Compassion, Green, Nature

earth-day-pictures-planet-from-space-netherlands-gullies_35000_600x450

Wadden Sea, near the Netherlands

If there is one thing that makes me happy and proud, it would be my eco-friendly home and habits. I am far from perfect, but every piece of trash I toss and every chemical I see on a label sticks with me. I think about Teflon chemicals found in the fat cells of Polar Bears. I think about giant plastic patches floating in the ocean. I think about poisoned seeds being sown across millions of acres of land. I carry these thoughts and so many more with me, and in order to avoid a complete daily meltdown I do everything I can to practice the things I hope will one day change the way we navigate the world.

This week I have all of my favorite eco-friendly products to share with you. After years of researching, and trial and error, I have a pretty epic list of favorites and I hope you’ll come back to give them a look. For today though, here’s a wonderful documentary on the importance of permaculture farming as THE alternative to chemical and monocrop agriculture. Here filmmaker Rebecca Hosking investigates how to transform her family farm into a more energy efficient farm of the future, and it’s a wonderful and enlightening watch. Our biggest impact on the planet comes from our energy consumption and how we eat. Both of these are addressed here, and the future of our food depends on information like this. (You’ll never think of horsepower the same way again.) Celebrate Earth Day by learning more about our food and energy.

[Image via National Geographic]

 

 




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